MARKET POPULISM

About of MARKET POPULISM









The Austin Chronicle Books: Readings

  • : : : READINGS Readings BY March 16, 2001: by Penny Van Horn One Market Under God Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy by Thomas Frank Doubleday, 414 pp., $26 No Logo Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies by Naomi Klein Picador USA, 512 pp., $28; $17 (paper) One of the myths of the tech economy is that a new breed of Hawaiian-shirted technology CEOs were going to transcend the smokestack conventions of the pinstriped, old-economy elite.



    TAP: Vol 11, Iss. 26. Divine Commerce. Michael King.
  • . For other pages: Divine Commerce By | One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism and the End of Economic Democracy , Thomas Frank.
  • . In One Market Under God , Frank (founding editor of The Baffler ) is after even bigger fish: the ways in which "market populism"--the unexamined presumption that the market and democracy are one and the same--has become the dominating ideology of our time, perhaps the closest thing we have to a civic religion.
  • . This is the central premise of what I will call "market populism": That in addition to being mediums of exchange, markets were mediums of consent.
  • . It is above all the history of market populism: its origins, its coalescence in the thought of certain business writers, its concentration in the worldview of certain industries (Internet theorists, for example, seem to be particularly fervent market populists), its rise to orthodoxy under Newt Gingrich and then with the seemingly less partisan dawning of the "New Economy, " and its consequences for American culture and American democracy.



    <nettime> review of thomas frank's one market under god (by naomi klein)
  • . Frank calls this conflation of capitalism with the public will "market populism", and sets out to answer a deceptively simple question: how did the market become us? His thesis is that the stock market became the voice of the people through a process of mock-revolution.
  • . Frank calls it the "People's Market", after that other great icon of faux populism, the People's Princess.
  • . As Frank documents, the task of market populism was not to make everybody rich, but to convince a majority of people that they were about to become very rich.
  • . Because market populism has us voting with our dollars many times a day, when (and if) we get around to voting with our ballot papers, it has tended, at least in the US, to be for candidates promising to give our money back to us.
  • . This is not new information, but Frank's analysis of market populism helps explain how a huge PR campaign touting our fantastic empowerment and imminent riches made these disparities socially acceptable.



    New Statesman - Voting with your wallet. After a huge propaganda campaign, the stock market is now seen as noble and democratic in its promise of riches for everyone.
  • . Frank calls this conflation of capitalism with the public will "market populism", and sets out to answer a deceptively simple question: how did the market become us?His thesis is that the stock market became the voice of the people through a process of mock-revolution.
  • . Frank calls it the "People's Market", after that other great icon of faux populism, the People's Princess.In Frank's telling, the pseudo revolution has been waged on many fronts.
  • . As Frank documents, the task of market populism was not to make everybody rich, but to convince a majority of people that they were about to become very rich.The more often these stories were told, however unrepresentative they were, the more people decided to try their luck on the stock market (last year, 49 per cent of US citizens owned stock).
  • . Because market populism has us voting with our dollars many times a day, when (and if) we get around to voting with our ballot papers, it has tended, at least in the US, to be for candidates promising to give our money back to us.

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    New Statesman - The New Statesman Essay - Markets 'R' Us
  • . This is how the New York Stock Exchange, long a nest of privilege, could be understood in the 1990s as a house of the people; how any niche marketing could be passed off as a revolutionary expression - an empowerment, even - of the demographic at which it was aimed.Market populism was just the thing for a social order requiring constant doses of legitimacy.
  • . According to market populism, elites were no longer those who spent their weekends at Club Med or watched sporting events from a skybox or fired half their workforce and shipped the factory south.
  • . New economy companies were doing without entire layers of experts and bureaucrats; they were turning their backs on standard methods of teaching and learning; they were tearing up the carefully designed flow charts and job descriptions of old.Historically, populism was a rebellion against the corporate order, a political tongue reserved by definition for the non-rich and the non-powerful.
  • . Clearly, something new was needed.This was where market populism came to the rescue.


    Cardigan Industries: Book Report: One Market Under God
  • Oct 26 00 BOOK REPORT: ONE MARKET UNDER GOD One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy by Thomas Frank Doubleday * * * My friends are tired of hearing me go on about Tom Frank, so now it’s your turn.
  • . Central here is the definition of a new market populism, in which corporate destroyers like Warren Buffet and Sam Walton are admired for their folksy ways, new-jack robber barons assume the role of pioneering rebels (“This plutocracy was cool!”), and everyone may count themselves among radicals whose defiance of past oppression is shouted with every eight-dollar E*Trade.


    Red Al's Musings: December 2004
  • . The problem is that the cure...market populism...is the cause of the very problems they are designed to address.Market populism is the reframing of free market ideology in the language of populism.
  • . And how do the modern day populist respond (thanks to Thomas Frank for this image)...they storm the bastile with their computers,, guns and bibles and demand that their are mad as hell and they are not going to take it anymore...and so to show how really pissed off we are...we demand that all your rich wealthy capitalists have to lower your taxes right now!...sigh....Everyone seems to have accepted the gospel of market populism even the liberals.
  • . Clinton his Democratic leadership Committee were as strong defenders of market populism as any in the republican camp.
  • . We have had round of populism before, 1890 and 1930, after corporate dominance caused economic decline urban and rural workers rose up to put the corporations at least partially back under democratic control.
  • . Liberals must reject market populism and reclaim the mantel of defender of the people in the face of multinational corporations.


    Barnes & Noble.com - One Market under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy - Thomas Frank - Paperback
  • 0 Items Find Related Items Other books by • Find Related Books • • More on this Subject Search for titles on this subject by checking only those that interest you: Nonfiction Business -> General Economics One Market under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy Format: Paperback Pub.
  • . ABOUT THE BOOK - PREVIEW WHAT'S INSIDE ABOUT THE BOOK One Market under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy FROM THE PUBLISHER Admirers of Thomas Frank's acerbic journal The Baffler and his book The Conquest of Cool know him as a latter-day H.
  • . During the recent economic boom, he argues, our nation's hallowed tradition of political populism has morphed into market populism, a reverence for financial success in the marketplace as the ultimate authority of all that is good and true.

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  • The stud of cultural studies One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy.
  • . But to attack market populism, Frank notes, is to get caught in a tidy little trap: "Since markets express the will of the people, virtually any criticism of business could be described as an act of despicable contempt for the common man." Frank is difficult to dismiss, because he actually reads enemy propaganda, poring through the glossy-paged ghettos of Business 2.0 , Wired and all those banal business books to extrapolate what the corporate elite are thinking.


    Crooked Timber » » Market Making versus Market Taking in Politics
  • . Perlstein’s prescription – a return to economic populism – seems to me to be the right and obvious way for Democrats to start remaking politics on their own terms.
  • . To which I can only repeat that if I had my pick of populisms, “it would be something along the lines of Matt Yglesias’ version of Kimberly Morgan’s thesis, addressing working families, along with strong redistributionist policies and a beefing up of union power.” posted on Friday, June 24th, 2005 at 10:16 am comments Damn, Farrell, you’re not supposed to tell them they can get the preliminary version for free on the Internets! Great points.
  • . And what do Americans say they want? According to the pollsters, exactly what the Democratic Party was once famous for giving them: economic populism.” All I can say is that this not quite the Democratic Party I am familiar with, at least in broad historical terms.
  • . Jerry Monaco Posted by · So, what are the terms – what kind of economic populism? There are many: anti-globalization? anti-immigration? protectionism? price/wage-control? wealth/income redistribution? crackdown on corporate crime? nationalization of industries? Posted by · Hmmm… the Goldwater book has been on my “must get to this” list for a while—maybe this one will, too.